Soccer’s Judas Kiss??

 

The technology use in soccer was long standing demand of a core of soccer lovers and it has recently been approved with sign and stamp by FIFA. Confederation cup this year and WC the next are going to be the first shows where it will be put into use. When it comes for questions, why it was required, then depressing pictures which comes in mind are disallowed ghost goal of Lampard against Germany, and fault of linesman against Mexico. No doubt, it sealed the fate of both the laborious teams, looking to settle some old humiliation against their rivals at biggest stage of the soccer world, the pain and anguish cause by ill decision of adamant bunch of linesmen and referees.
 
How many times it has been demanded since then is a pressing question. The advocates of this technology quote example from the fraternity of Cricket, tennis, hockey etc. which have updated themselves for new version. Actually, cricket and tennis carry a nature of start-stop games and these frequent intervals has not caused much harm to their beauty. Agreed that in tennis, there is every possibility of a human error, where only a mere kiss of the ball, travelling at about 200 kmph, on any line can cause-effect the complexion of the whole match. We have funny pictures of players arguing with umpires whether it was in or out in tennis world. John McEnroe is still the epitome of it, which even led to his expulsion from Melbourne in 1990! In cricket often we have seen players, even from third man, screaming for LBWs in their favour and Hockey is no different to the club.
 
But football is different. The volume of the ball is big and it is very easy to identify where the ball is/was. That is why the game is so spectator friendly and can be enjoyed from any corner of the stadium. The game is free flowing (ban on back pass has added more fuel), fast, demands quick decisions, telepathic conversation among the members etc. It generates instant cheer or jeer among the spectators, specially at the time when the goal is scored. These are some of the reasons that why even after so many years, soccer is still an eyesore in popularity for other sports.
 
 Now imagine the new scenario where whole stadia of people, many a times rabid fans, are waiting for decision on giant screen, much like red or green light of cricket. The whole crescendo and pandemonium is suddenly muted by a flashing bulb. It will surely deplete it’s hallowed reputation. A leaf (remedy) for troubling decisions can be picked from audible signals on each point of time the rule is bypassed. It will not interrupt the rhythm and a broad mind review of the stamped letter on the table of Sepp Blatter is desired to save the beautiful game before it joins others.